“The most significant thing that the disciple community could do to begin to recover a robust and maturing doctrine of creation is to recover the practice of worship that praises the Father, the Son, and the Spirit and participates in the dialectic of the kingdom. To bring these two together— worship and the doctrine of creation— would be a quest with little expectation of success, except that it is always by grace that God judges and renews God’s people. When we have ‘services of celebration’ and Sunday morning gatherings that are largely evangelistically focused, to recover the practice of worship requires a change of mind (repentance) in many parts of the church.

Often our ‘worship’ has no clear Trinitarian grammar and thus fails to bring us into the presence of the one God— Father, Son, and Spirit. Likewise, our worship receives little guidance from theological convictions and thus is shaped not by the praise of God but by congregational politics and preferences. Along with these failings, we often think of ‘worship’ as a means of getting us through the next week in this fallen world rather than as participation in the redemption of creation and anticipation of the telos of the new creation. Too often we simply accept the way things are and look to ‘worship’ to help us manage with the way things are.

Worship of the Father, the Son, and the Spirit should bring us into that most real world of God’s redemption of creation so that our lives are continually transformed. This aspiration may be realized only by the gracious work of God. To know God and to be known by God in transformative ways are what gathers us to be the disciple community from first to last.”

Wilson, Jonathan R.. God’s Good World : Reclaiming the Doctrine of Creation. Grand Rapids, US: Baker Academic, 2014.