“The most significant thing that the disciple community could do to begin to recover a robust and maturing doctrine of creation is to recover the practice of worship that praises the Father, the Son, and the Spirit and participates in the dialectic of the kingdom. To bring these two together— worship and the doctrine of creation— would be a quest with little expectation of success, except that it is always by grace that God judges and renews God’s people. When we have ‘services of celebration’ and Sunday morning gatherings that are largely evangelistically focused, to recover the practice of worship requires a change of mind (repentance) in many parts of the church.

Often our ‘worship’ has no clear Trinitarian grammar and thus fails to bring us into the presence of the one God— Father, Son, and Spirit. Likewise, our worship receives little guidance from theological convictions and thus is shaped not by the praise of God but by congregational politics and preferences. Along with these failings, we often think of ‘worship’ as a means of getting us through the next week in this fallen world rather than as participation in the redemption of creation and anticipation of the telos of the new creation. Too often we simply accept the way things are and look to ‘worship’ to help us manage with the way things are.

Worship of the Father, the Son, and the Spirit should bring us into that most real world of God’s redemption of creation so that our lives are continually transformed. This aspiration may be realized only by the gracious work of God. To know God and to be known by God in transformative ways are what gathers us to be the disciple community from first to last.”

Wilson, Jonathan R.. God’s Good World : Reclaiming the Doctrine of Creation. Grand Rapids, US: Baker Academic, 2014.

Spurgeon on the Trinity

"How unwisely do those young believers talk, who make preferences in the Persons of the Trinity..."

C.H. SpurgeonMARK, beloved, the union of the Three Divine Persons in all their gracious acts. We believe that there is one God, and although we rejoice to recognize the Trinity, yet it is ever most distinctly a Trinity in Unity, Our watch-word still is—“Hear O Israel, the LORD our God is one LORD.”

How unwisely do those young believers talk, who make preferences in the Persons of the Trinity; who think of Christ as if he were the embodiment of everything that is lovely and gracious, while the Father they regard as severely just, but destitute of kindness; and how foolish are those who magnify the decree of the Father, or the atonement of the Son, so as to depreciate the work of the Spirit. In deeds of grace none of the Persons of the Trinity act apart from the rest. They are as united in their deeds as in their essence. In their love towards the chosen they are one, and in the actions which flow from that great central source they are still undivided.

Specially I would have you notice this in the case of sanctification. While we may without the slightest mistake speak of sanctification as the work of the Spirit, yet we must take heed that we do not view it as if the Father and the Son had no part therein. It is correct to speak of sanctification as the work of the Father, of the Spirit, and of the Son. Still doth Jehovah say, “Let us make man in our own image after our likeness,” and thus we are “his workmanship, created in Christ Jesus unto good works, which God hath before ordained that we should walk in them.”

Spurgeon, C. H. (1862). Threefold Sanctification. In The Metropolitan Tabernacle Pulpit Sermons (Vol. 8, p. 85). London: Passmore & Alabaster.